Tag Archives: Research

Botox and Dentistry

botoxTo say that Botox is a popular esthetic treatment is a vast understatement. Over 21 years has past since the introduction of botulinum toxin A injections (Botox) have been used for the unsightly frown lines between the eyes and smoothing of facial wrinkles. Botox treatments are the most commonly preformed minimally invasive cosmetic procedure in North America. There were nearly 2.5 million cosmetic procedures done with Botox in 2008 according to The American Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery. Women accounted for 92% of the total cosmetic procedures done. Botox cosmetic procedures accounted for 24% of all cosmetic procedures done in 2008. The safety records of Botox treatment is nearly unparalleled by just about any other delivered medication on the market. Continue reading Botox and Dentistry

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FACTS ABOUT TOOTH DECAY

dental decay

Did you know that pediatric dental disease, also referred to as childhood tooth decay, is the #1 chronic childhood illness? When left untreated, childhood tooth decay can have devastasting Continue reading FACTS ABOUT TOOTH DECAY

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Amalgam Tattoos

amalgum tattoo

What Is It?

You or your dentist may notice a gray, blue or black spot in your mouth that looks like a tattoo. Dentists call these spots amalgam tattoos. They can appear in the mouth of someone with amalgam fillings or metal false teeth (also known as “caps” or “crowns”). Amalgam fillings contain silver, tin, mercury, copper and zinc. Amalgam tattoos are made up of tiny metal particles from the filling or crown that become embedded in the tissue. They can appear on your gums, cheek, lips, tongue or the roof of the mouth (palate).
The tattoos are flat and usually quite small — only a few millimeters. But they’re relatively easy to see. Continue reading Amalgam Tattoos

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Types of cosmetic dentistry

Cosmetic dentistry may involve:

  1. the addition of a dental material to teeth or gums – examples: bonding, porcelain veneers (laminates), crowns (caps), gum grafts
  2. the removal of tooth structure or gums – examples: enameloplasty, gingivectomy
  3. neither adding nor removing dental materials, tooth structure, or gums – examples: teeth whitening (bleaching), gum depigmentation
  4. straightening of teeth accompanied by improvement in appearance of face – Orthodontics Continue reading Types of cosmetic dentistry
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Invention of the Tooth brush, Tooth paste and Dental Floss

Toothbrushdcce6b76ef26a8f602d05ba917d10adb_185_130_toothpaste

Natural bristle brushes were invented by the ancient Chinese who made toothbrushes with bristles from the necks of cold climate pigs.
French dentists were the first Europeans to promote the use of toothbrushes in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. William Addis of Clerkenwald, England, created the first mass-produced toothbrush. The first American to patent a toothbrush was H. N. Wadsworth and many American Companies began to mass-produce toothbrushes after 1885. The Pro-phy-lac-tic brush made by the Florence Manufacturing Company of Massachusetts is one example of an early American made toothbrush. The Florence Manufacturing Company was also the first to sell toothbrushes packaged in boxes. In 1938, DuPont manufactured the first nylon bristle toothbrushes Continue reading Invention of the Tooth brush, Tooth paste and Dental Floss

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New guidelines for taking antibiotics before dental procedures

Taking a precautionary antibiotic before a trip to the dentist isn’t necessary for most people and, in fact, might do more harm than good, according to updated recommendations from the American Heart Association.

Good news in the new guidelines

The AHA’s guidelines were published in its scientific journal, “Circulation”, earlier this year and there is good news: the AHA recommends that only people who are at the greatest risk of bad outcomes from infective endocarditis (IE) should receive short-term preventive antibiotics before routine dental procedures. Infective endocarditis is an infection of the heart’s inner lining or the heart valves, which results when bacteria enter the bloodstream and travel to the heart.pil mouth

The guidelines say that many patients who have taken preventive antibiotics regularly in the past no longer need them, including people with the following conditions:

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How will my injury be treated?

Chipped or Fractured Teeth

traumaticinjuries01Most chipped or fractured tooth crowns can be repaired either by reattaching the broken piece or by placing a tooth-colored filling. If a significant portion of the tooth crown is broken off, an artificial crown or “cap” may be needed to restore the tooth.

If the pulp is exposed or damaged after a crown fracture, root canal treatment may be needed. These injuries require special attention. If breathing through your mouth or drinking cold fluids is painful, bite on clean, moist gauze or cloth to help relieve symptoms until reaching your dentist’s office. Never use topical oral pain medications (such as Anbesol®) or ointments, or place aspirin on the affected areas to eliminate pain symptoms. Continue reading How will my injury be treated?

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4 Steps to a Perfect Dental Marketing Plan

dental plan

Step 1: Start with tried and true postcard marketing.
Postcard marketing is a proven method for bringing in new patients to your practice. Direct mail casts your marketing net. You use targeted mailing lists to put your message right in the mailbox of qualified prospects, such as those who are new to the area and have dental insurance. When these prospects contact your office and book appointments, your professionalism and treatment quality turns them into long-term patients.
Another use for postcards is to bring current patients in for checkup appointments. Growing your practice is about growing every aspect of your patient base, so that means getting more from your current patients too. Direct mail marketing gets you results for both of these goals. Continue reading 4 Steps to a Perfect Dental Marketing Plan

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A New Era in Dental Management and Marketing

A dentist is no longer just a dentist. To survive in today’s economic climate, a dentist must shift attention to matters such as employee management, OSHA compliance, malpractice, web presence, and search-engine optimization. This “juggling act” has forced dentists to wear too many hats and sacrifice the one thing that led them to dentistry in the first place, caring for patients. In order to regain this lost identity, dentists must develop creative and efficient ways of marketing.dental tech2

Today, marketing companies offer endless opportunities to promote a dental office. However, a dentist must be careful and prudent to avoid potential scams and maximize their investment. Through my many years in practice, I have found the most important factor in ensuring your marketing dollars don’t go to waste is internal marketing. This includes the demeanor and outlook of the staff, office theme and décor, cleanliness, and anything else that enhances the patient’s overall experience during a visit. Marketing will surely increase traffic; however, that is only half the battle. The key to marketing is making sure that patients enjoy their visit and come back. Continue reading A New Era in Dental Management and Marketing

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